Meet The Doctor

 

Hello, planet Earth (or if you’re from another planet, then hello to you too, my dear). I am a doctor, a psychologist to be exact. I am also a scientist, a writer, animal lover, and a full time geek. Geek culture had a powerful effect on my life, helping me recover from PTSD and learn to manage my chronic pain disorder, uncover my secret superpowers, and discover a way that I can help others.

In working with both active duty service members and civilians I saw the powerful impact that stories have on our lives. When we relate to a particular person, real or fictional, this can make us fell less alone, inspire us to make a difference, and can potentially help us heal. I began incorporating relatable examples from geek culture into therapy, first with active duty Marines, many of whom love Batman and Superman. I was astounded at how well it was received and how many people are interested in having fictional characters brought up in therapy. I then started incorporating fictional characters into the research-supported therapies that I am trained to use, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

Somehow this type of therapy, which I call Superhero Therapy, became really popular and between using superheroes and characters from science fiction and fantasy in therapy, I was starting to get a lot of requests to do guest lectures and workshops. It all happened pretty quickly and was extremely exciting. Last year I was interviewed several times by The Huffington Post Live TV, I was invited to present at different conferences, both pop culture related (like the San Diego Comic Con) and professional ones, and was invited to give lectures and provide training to medical residents and psychology graduate and post-doctorate students at various hospitals and universities, including Rady’s Children’s Hospital in San Diego and the Veteran’s Affairs (VA) Hospital. I could not be happier to share my love for geeky things with the world and I hope that more  medical and mental health settings will start and continue to implement geek culture into treatment.

I am currently working on a few projects, most of them are a secret at this point but I want to shout them off the top of a mountain. Once I am able to reveal them, I shall. Some of the ones I can announce at the moment are the several books that I am extremely honored to contribute to: Star Wars Psychology, Walking Dead Psychology, Game of Thrones Psychology, Captain America vs. Iron Man Psychology, Doctor Who Psychology, Star Trek Psychology, and others. In addition, I am honored to have written my own book, Superhero Therapy, which is part book and part comic book, illustrated by the incredible Wellinton Alves, published by the amazing Little, Brown and Company.

I am currently working as a Clinical Psychologist at at the Center for Stress and Anxiety Management. My job is to help people with PTSD, anxiety, and depression.

If you would like to get in touch with me, please feel free to find me on Facebook, TwitterAmazon, or by email: SuperheroTherapy@gmail.com.

Before I end my introduction here, I wanted to leave you with this video because… well, because it’s just freakin’ awesome!

In case you’d like some further resources:

To learn more about Superhero Therapy, check out some of the links below:

superhero

What is Superhero Therapy?

Interview with CSAM about Superhero Therapy

24 Comics that capture the difficulties of living with anxiety

The Mental Illness Happy Hour: Dean Trippe on how comics helped him overcome PTSD

Find out which comic book issues represent specific themes, which can be useful in therapy from Comicspedia: http://www.comicspedia.net/database.html

How X-Men helped me overcome PTSD

Find out how stories can be healing through Geek Therapy: http://www.geektherapy.com/

More news and analyses of your favorite heroes are available through Travis Langley’s Psychology Today column, Beyond Heroes and Villains

Can’t get enough of Batman and want to learn the psychology behind it? Check out Arkham Asylum Sessions podcast 

http://www.graphicmedicine.org

https://www.amazon.com/Superhero-Therapy-Mindfulness-Anxiety-Depression/dp/1684030331/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1506464298&sr=8-1&keywords=superhero+Therapy

https://www.amazon.com/Harry-Potter-Therapy-Unauthorized-Restricted/dp/1548107158/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1506464320&sr=1-1&keywords=Harry+Potter+therapy

 

NSPL_Logo

If you or someone you know is thinking about committing suicide, here is the information about available resources: National Suicide Prevention Hotline: http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

More resources for what to do if someone you know is thinking about committing suicide can be found on this blog post

 

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with Dr. Scarlet or inquire about trainings/workshops, please contact, Dr. Scarlet’s manager, Dustin McGinnis: Dustin.McGinnis01@gmail.com

50 comments on “Meet The Doctor

  1. Jim on

    I have a lot of crap in my head. I’ve been told I have a tremendous game face to the real world. I’m an attorney and I’m a poor one who frankly helps people in need. I’ve been diagnosed with Psychotic Depression, PTSD, and a bit of Anxiety to boot. I’ve always wanted to be strong, always wanted to be Superman. I’m not Superman.

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Jim, thank you so much for your heartfelt comment. You know what I really love about Superman? He’s so incredibly unique. There’s no one like him. He is an alien from another planet. He’s experienced severe losses and much trauma. And there aren’t really many people that really get him. He is this amazing superhero that protects people but not many people truly know who he really is and what he’s really been through. Superman actually has many vulnerabilities, not only Kryptonite, but also the trauma and many losses and the fears of being misunderstood or rejected. And that’s what truly makes him remarkable. What strikes me is how similar you are to him. You’ve had this incredible battle with your own vulnerabilities and here you are: helping people in need, every way you can. Just like Superman. And while there may not be many people that know the real you, the Superman persona you’ve adopted has changed many lives and that is what makes you a Superhero.
      Don’t forget your cape 🙂

      Reply
  2. Sam on

    Hi my name is Sam. I am a senior in college and am 26 years old. I am working on my thesis and have always had a passion for reading, superheroes, the fantasy genre, video games, and all things geek worthy. However, I have had a difficult life. I tend to have a hard time socially and have always been big hearted and very sensitive. I have been on a slow path and am 26 and still working on a degree I have had my heart broken quite a bit and have always had trouble with discipline and the like. The whole idea of my thesis was how relating to fictional charcters could help clients reassess their values, help work on what scares them, and assert the demigod/superhero within them. It is heartening to see that this is being done and I salute you Janina. However, I could use some guidance on the whole process and whatnot. I am still struggling but I understand the empowerment of therapy and the power of compassion. Sam- Social Work Senior at McDaniel College
    Westminster, MD

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Sam,
      Thank you so much for your comment and feedback. What a wonderful way to incorporate your passion for superheroes, fantasy, games into your life! Your thesis sounds fantastic, I would love to read it when you’re finished. Are you planning to publish it?
      I’m so sorry to hear that you’ve had a hard life, as every superhero, it seems that you’ve faced your own nemeses and came out on top. That’s truly inspirational. At some point, if you’re willing, I’d love to know more about your story, which specific characters helped you through difficult times and how.
      You said that you could use some guidance, I’m happy to help in whichever way I am able. Here’s my email: superherotherapy@gmail.com, feel free to email me there. I salute you right back, sir, and wish you the very best with your thesis.

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  3. Alex on

    I love the work that you do Dr. Scarlet. It is such a great idea to incorporate Superheroes into the treatment of your patients because it truly shows us that even the mightiest of us are still vulnerable sometimes. I was wondering how you came up with Superhero therapy, and what superhero you identify yourself with?

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Aww, thanks so much, Alex! 🙂
      I was always fascinated with Superheroes and other fictional characters. I’m inspired by the idea that we can come out of even the worst possible situations, learn from them, and help others. I started casually using some Superhero examples with active duty Marines with PTSD and the results were wonderful. I’m now talking about Superheroes with both the military and the civilian populations.
      The Superhero I most strongly identify with is Storm from the X-Men. She can control the weather, she is in touch with nature, and she values helping others and does so even when she is afraid (Storm suffers from claustrophobia).
      Thank you so much for your lovely comment and support 🙂

      Reply
  4. John on

    Dr. Scarlet,
    My name is John, I am currently a mental health counselor for King County (Seattle area). I am slowly in the process of building my private practice, and website.

    I have the opportunity to run a six week group for youth which is utilizing the origin stories of superheroes to help students engage their own painful experiences via normalization of, and relating to, the trauma/tragedy found in the origin stories of the heroes we love.

    I would love to discuss this further via email, and get your thoughts/perspectives in this work, if you are open to that. Please let me know, thank you much and great website!

    John

    Reply
  5. Lee on

    Hello,

    I just happened to stumble across your website today and I wanted to say that the work you’re doing is excellent. Using superheroes is such a smart way to help others. I also ready your story about overcoming PTSD, it was inspiring. I struggle frequently with depression and sometimes find it very challenging to fight through. I also deal with a chronic illness as well. I think I come across as having it “all put together” but on the inside it doesn’t feel like it. I also think my family doesn’t realize how much I’m battling with on a day to day basis. I actually work in the mental health field as well and I’m able to put my struggles aside to help others. None of my coworkers are aware that I deal with depression. I think that may be one of the reasons I don’t seek out a therapist, I don’t want people to know and I don’t want to come across as weak, or even admit that I actually deal with depression. Cost is a factor and finding someone that I would actually feel comfortable discussing what I’m going through is another challenge. This reply turned out longer and more than I expected to share, I just wanted to tell you thank you for all of the good work that you’re doing.

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Lee,
      thank you so much for your heartwarming comment. I”m so sorry to hear about your struggle with depression and chronic illness. You are not alone in fearing that opening up to others might come across as weak. I work with active duty Marines with PTSD. Most of them tell me that coming to see me and opening up about their experiences was scarier than any life-threatining situations they faced in Afghanistan. These are the bravest people I know. And I think that facing one’s fears, especially the fear of being seen as we are, the fear of letting other people in is the most courageous thing we can do. You spend every day helping others, that’s heroism, and you opened up to me in this post, that’s courage.
      I hope one day you realize how wonderful you are and I hope that one day you will be able to get the support that you deserve. Thank you so much again for your comment.

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  6. Sarah M. on

    Wow. I happened upon this site while researching some context for a paper about Iron Man, and it’s incredible. I should have gone with the Doctor however– it was a dream of mine to write at least one very serious academic paper centered on Doctor Who. Wonder if it’s too late to change? At any rate, my story is similar to many: Two years ago, I was a sophomore in college and battling some serious depression and anxiety. I never sought help because I’ve lived a pretty comfortable life and I thought that I was making a big deal out of nothing. I told myself to snap out of it, that I was just lazy and there were people with real problems who were holding it together better than me. When I couldn’t sleep, I watched Doctor Who and soaked in the positivity and warmth that came from the show, and it kept me from some very dark places until I received clinical help. Watching season 8 depression and anxiety-free was quite an adventure– I hadn’t thought it was possible to love it more! Thank you for your point of view of pop culture’s effect on psychology. I’m one of millions who can attest that it provides a space for people that goes far beyond mere coping mechanism and straight into something that resembles a kind of sphere in which we can feel loved and identified with, where we can learn and grow until we’re ready to try facing the real world and its gray(er) areas again.

    Cheerfully,
    Sarah

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Sarah,
      wow, thank you so much for your heartwarming comment, I teared up reading it. I’m so glad that Doctor Who and other elements of pop culture have been so helpful to you. I’m curious, which class is the Iron Man paper for? It seems that so many people are so incredible hard on themselves when they’re going through a hard time. I get that way too. At the time when we are hard on ourselves we are both the attacker and the attacked. I think one of the hardest things to do is to open up about our feelings and to give ourselves the support and kindness that we need. Thank you so much for your comment and for your courage. I’m so glad to hear that your anxiety and depression have ceased and thank you so much for your support 🙂

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  7. Sarah Kay L. on

    Hi Dr. Scarlet,

    I attended WonderCon weeks ago and sat in your Psychology of Cult TV panel. As a Psychology student, I felt that attending that panel was necessary. I was so glad that I did as I was very interested with everything you and the other panelists had to say. I’m also very intrigued with your idea of “superhero therapy” and love your application of it.

    I plan on pursuing a PhD after graduating with my BA. Although I ruled out the clinical aspect of Psychology as a career, I am very much interested in research. I particularly enjoyed learning about your research and the findings at the panel (e.g. The Doctor at the camp with kids study). I’m looking into doing research in the area of media psychology. I always wanted to use the shows I love in future research, and when you explained your research, I was super excited to know that it is possible.

    I was wondering if you may have the time to discuss about this field, including how I can pursue something like it?

    Thank you so much for your time,
    Sarah Kay

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Sarah,
      Thank you so much for your lovely post and for coming to my panel at WonderCon.
      I’m so glad that you’re interested in this field and that you’re planning to pursue your doctorate after your BA. How exciting!
      Of course, email me: superherotherapy@gmail.com, we can chat more

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  8. Tori on

    Hello! My name is Tori and I’m a Grade 11 in a Psychology class at my school.
    For our independent study unit, we were asked to choose a topic and question
    to research on. I picked the topic of superheroes, and my inquiry question
    is: “Can superheroes be used as psychological treatment, and if so, is this
    an ethical and effective way of providing therapy?”
    As part of my research, I thought that consulting an expert would probably be
    a good idea. It would be a tremendous help if you could answer the following
    questions:

    1. How are superheroes used as psychological treatment (specifically)?
    2. Why do you consider superheroes to be a good form of psychological
    treatment?
    3. Is this an ethical and safe form of treatment?
    4. Is this an effective form of treatment?
    5. Has there been more success stories with this form of treatment, or less?
    6. Could you provide any good specific examples of cases where people were
    treated with superhero therapy?
    7. Are there any bad examples of cases where people were treated with
    superhero therapy (where it went wrong; didn’t work; etc)?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Tori,
      great to meet you! Thank you for your email. What a wonderful topic! I’m honored to be interviewed for your project.
      Here are the answers to your questions:
      1. How are superheroes used as psychological treatment (specifically)?
      Very often my patients might have a hard time talking about their painful experiences. I usually ask them if there are any superheroes or other fictional characters they like or fictional works that they identify with. We then use these examples to first talk about the fictional character’s experience and then about the patient’s. Patients are usually able to draw parallels between their experiences and the fictional characters’ and using these we then work together toward recovery using evidence-based (meaning, research-supported) therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or acceptance and commitment therapy.

      Here’s more info on that: http://www.superhero-therapy.com/2015/01/what-is-superhero-therapy-2/

      2. Why do you consider superheroes to be a good form of psychological
      treatment?
      For many people who have experienced some kind of trauma or depression, they often feel as if they are the only person going through it and that no one else will understand them. It’s often therapeutic for people to connect with other people or even fictional characters to really understand how something is affecting them. In addition, people often do not feel safe or do not have the vocabulary to express how they are feeling after a traumatic event (for example, rape). However, seeing another person or a fictional character experience something like this can make it easier for the patient to better understand their trauma and be more willing to work on it in therapy. Like superheroes, my patients are often asked to face their biggest fears, like talking about their traumatic experiences or work on their fears (for example, fear of heights or fears of tight spaces). Connecting with a superhero can give the patient the very courage they need to face it.
      So, essentially, the goal of superhero therapy is to help the patient feel more connected to their experience, be willing to process their traumatic event, or depression, or anxiety, and then be able to work on it, “like a superhero.”

      3. Is this an ethical and safe form of treatment?
      It depends on how it is used, of course, but incorporating fictional characters, like superheroes, for example into evidence-based therapy seems to be safe and ethical overall.

      4. Is this an effective form of treatment?
      That’s a great question! Once again, it really depends on how it is used. There is currently very little research to support the claim that using superheroes (and other fictional characters) in therapy is helpful, however, there is a ton of research showing that using examples and metaphors, such as those used in acceptance and commitment therapy, is helpful and effective. Using this theory, we can then assume that using metaphors and examples that include superheroes are also effective, however, we would need more research to substantiate this claim. (I’m currently running some research projects on this and hopefully there will be more soon).

      5. Has there been more success stories with this form of treatment, or less?
      While there isn’t much rigorous research on superhero therapy, overall it seems like people who identify with fictional characters or other role models are more likely to recover than people who do not.

      6. Could you provide any good specific examples of cases where people were
      treated with superhero therapy?
      Yes! One of my patients was undergoing treatment for a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after being sexually assaulted. Her family could not understand why after 6 months this girl was still experiencing a lot of symptoms. The first few times I met with her she just cried. She had a hard time talking about what happened to her and was not willing to. When I asked her about any fictional characters she likes, she stated that she likes “Buffy, the vampire slayer.” There was an episode in season 6 (SPOILER WARNING), where Buffy was brought back from the dead by her friends and had a very difficult time talking to them about how she felt. She was angry a lot, she couldn’t sleep, she was having nightmares, she was jumpy, she was angry and irritable, and did not want to be around her friends. When she finally sat down with her friend, Spike, she confided in him that she was still traumatized about being brought back from the dead and that “everything hurt,” every moment, from one day to another. I showed a part of this episode to my patient (she had already seen it but this was the first time we watched it together in this way). When she watched Buffy’s interaction with Spike, she cried and stated that it was exactly how she felt. She then showed that episode to her family, who were able to finally understand why she wasn’t “all better” yet. Over time, this patient was able to open up about her experience and like Buffy, was able to reconnect with her friends and activities that were very important to her.

      7. Are there any bad examples of cases where people were treated with
      superhero therapy (where it went wrong; didn’t work; etc)?
      I don’t quite have examples of where it didn’t work. There were some times where the patient didn’t fully connect with the specific example but we were usually able to find another one.

      Hope this helps and best of luck with your project 🙂

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  9. Karin on

    This is fantastic. It really is. I myself have and is struggling with depression from time to time, anxiety, panic attacks and a trauma trigger located in my everyday life. I was severely bullied as a child and had very few friends, and i also struggled to be accepted and understood by grown ups in school because of yet to be indetifyed disorders (ADHD and DCD). All of this is the foundation to my problems today, that I fight to overcome.

    I always loved books, especially fantasy and sci-fi. When i was little it was there I found most my friends and could escape reality. It helped me, gave me place ro breath and just don’t worry.

    Therefor, I say again, that This is amazing. I really hope this can spread to other parts of the world someday, like here, to my home country of Sweden, because I know it would do so much good and it deserve more recognition.

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Karin. I’m so sorry to hear about your past struggles but so glad that you’ve found relief through fiction. My book, Superhero Therapy is coming out next year and will be available in Europe, hopefully this will include Sweden. If not, email me, I’ll try to mail it to you.
      Cheers 🙂

      Reply
  10. Tori on

    Sorry to bother you again (it’s Tori from the grade 11 Psych class) but I was wondering if you had any statistics about superhero therapy that I could use in a graph or something. Like statistics for the success rate, or for how long people have been using superhero therapy as a form of treatment, etc. I realize superhero therapy doesn’t have a lot of research to it yet, so I’ll understand if you can’t answer with any straightforward statistics. Thanks!

    Reply
  11. Stephanie Reis on

    Hello!

    I went to your panel at new York comic con. I am currently in my masters for Mental Health in NY and I was wondering if you can send me the info you have from your preliminary studies so I can read it. I find your superhero therapy so interesting and amazing! I have been considering my PhD and I have always wondered how to incorporate my geek side into therapy so I’d like to read more about it!!

    Thank you

    Reply
  12. Jeff M on

    Hello Dr. Scarlet,

    I am currently a student getting ready to graduate and my thesis revolves around the potential that comics and superheroes have to empower those who read about them to overcome their own obstacles. Unfortunately my research has hit a wall and I am reaching out directly to the experts. I saw your website and after reading into the therapy I feel you can give some much needed insight. Would it be alright if I can send you a list of questions that you can answer regarding the issue? Id be very grateful having your thoughts backing up my thesis. Also would you happen to know if there is any concrete statistical data on this version of therapy? I haven’t been able to find anything narrowing down the numbers or even showing a graph or two on its use.

    Thank you and I hope to hear back from you soon,

    Reply
  13. Alyssa Ragoonath on

    Hi Dr. Scarlett,
    I am a postgrad student at Nottingham Trent University and I’m currently conducting some research on comic book therapy and its effectiveness in reducing anxiety and depression. My project is to propose a study in mentally ill offenders and I would like to propose the drawing of comic strips in group settings. But, in order to propose this, I need to have some form of research showing that something along the same lines has been done. I have contacted Dr. O’Connor but was told that very little research has been done. Can you point me in the direction of any work you may have done in this area? This would be really helpful. My email address is ragoonathalyssa@gmail.com in the event you have information. Thanks in advance.

    Alyssa

    Reply
  14. Robert Sullivan on

    Hi Doctor Scarlet,

    I am currently a graduate student studying mental health counseling. I was reading your article on Psychology Today about the psychology behind Inside Out and I happen to catch the term “Superhero Therapy”. After looking into it, I am overwhelmed with excitement over the idea of this! I am such a geek and absolutely love the idea of incorporating some of my favorite characters into my therapeutic work with clients. Coming on to your site and seeing posts related to Star Wars, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones has made me an immediate fan of this. I would be so grateful to get some more information from you about it. Love the concept and I love all the work of yours that I’ve read so far! Thank you in advance for for your time.

    Best,

    Robert

    Reply
  15. Melanie on

    Dear Dr. Scarlet,

    Hello! My name is Melanie, and I am a student at MCP. I have an upcoming project in which I had dedicated to study my all-time favorite villain, the Joker. I checked out your website and can see how interested you are in analyzing the psychological sides of comic book characters. If you don’t mind, would you please answer a few questions concerning the Joker? It would definitely benefit my research project. Thank you so much!

    1.What quality or aspect of the Joker do you believe is most interesting?
    2. What quality or aspect of the Joker do you think is most appealing to others? (Comic fans, movie fans, etc.)
    3. What is the Joker’s impact on pop culture society as a whole?
    4. Is the Joker really insane?
    5. What would his diagnoses be? Why? (Schizophrenic? Split personality?, etc.? Please list as many as possible.)
    6. Do you believe he is aware of his actions and intentions or is he unconscious of them due to his “insanity?”
    7. What do you believe the Joker’s motives are?
    8. If he was your patient, what treatments would be conducted/would you suggest to integrate his personality into society? In other words, how would you try to cure him?
    9. Where do you believe his extreme personality stems from? Traumatic childhood experience?

    Thank you for everything! I really appreciate it!

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Melanie,
      Thank you so much for your questions and your thoughtful comment. So sorry it took me a while to respond, I was out of the country and it made it difficult to check my website while I was away.
      Here are my answers to the best of my ability:

      1.What quality or aspect of the Joker do you believe is most interesting?
      I believe that what fascinates most people is that he seems to genuinely enjoy the kinds of things that most others would not – primarily chaos and destruction.

      2. What quality or aspect of the Joker do you think is most appealing to others? (Comic fans, movie fans, etc.)
      Similarly, I believe that Joker’s humor and the joy that he gets from causing chaos seems appealing to others. I think people might be fascinated on how unapologetic he is about his behavior and I think that for most people there is a bit of an appeal about being naughty.

      3. What is the Joker’s impact on pop culture society as a whole?
      Great question! Thank you so much for asking that! I think that he created a new type of villain, one that became almost a measuring sticks against which other villains are measured.

      4. Is the Joker really insane?
      Psychologically, there is no such thing as “insanity,” it is actually a legal term, which means whether or not he understands the wrongfulness of his actions. Given how calculating he is, my answer to that would be, “no” – he is not insane, as he appears to know right from wrong but chooses to do “wrong” because he enjoys it.

      5. What would his diagnoses be? Why? (Schizophrenic? Split personality?, etc.? Please list as many as possible.)
      The most likely diagnosis would probably be Antisocial Personality Disorder

      6. Do you believe he is aware of his actions and intentions or is he unconscious of them due to his “insanity?”
      I believe that he is aware but he chooses to behave that way anyway

      7. What do you believe the Joker’s motives are?
      Truthfully, I think that boredom is extremely aversive to him and he enjoys chaos, it might make him feel empowered or more alive.

      8. If he was your patient, what treatments would be conducted/would you suggest to integrate his personality into society? In other words, how would you try to cure him?
      I would not be qualified to treat him if he came to see me, as I do not specialize in this disorder, I specialize in PTSD, depression, and anxiety, none of which he has. If I had to treat him for whatever reason, I would probably use Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to try to teach him mindfulness skills, as well as to help him meet his values and goals in a less destructive way.

      9. Where do you believe his extreme personality stems from? Traumatic childhood experience?
      It is possible, however, it is also likely that he might have something going on with him on a biological level. Many people with antisocial personality disorder might also have a lower biological ability for empathy, making it more difficult for them to care for others.

      Hope this helps 🙂

      Reply
  16. Ludmyla Bárbafra Quirino on

    Hello Doc!
    My name is Ludmyla, from Brazil, I’m a psychology student, passionate about geeks stufs and tremendously curious. I was watching Jessica Jones when I had the impetus for research on what psychology’s relationship with this universe is. I’m already super excited about everything I’ve seen here, the association of two things I love is tremendously incredible! I’m happy to see psychologists like you, I hope to be like this. I want to know everything about, lear abou it for real. In fact, I have discovered what I want. Amazing !
    Most importantly, I will not forget my cape !

    Reply
  17. Andy Fisher on

    Hi Janina

    Not sure if you are aware of the work I am doing at http://www.theheroforge.com?

    I would love the chance to interview you for the podcast at some point soon, if we can find a window? I think the idea of blending the heroic archetype and CBT is fascinating. Perhaps you can take a look around the site and then come back to me if you are interested. Keep up the great work – you are clearly making a big difference x

    Reply
  18. Michael on

    I need help. I have anxiety, agoraphobia (though, I am not home bound) and of course, depression follows my fight or flight episodes which are coming more an more often. I am seeing a counselor, but she is really just for venting. She’s not offering specific treatment or anything because I don’t think that is her training, background, etc. I have an appointment with a psychiatrist in a couple weeks to hopefully get some medication that helps and talk with him about perhaps getting a referral to a trained psychologist.

    I’ve struggled with anxiety, agoraphobia, and anxiety all my life, but recently it has gotten worse – I think because I’ve stopped trying to run from it and am ready to deal with it.

    Is there anyway that Superhero Therapy can help me?? My love of superheroes brought me to this page and that cannot be coincidence!

    Reply
    • Janina Scarlet on

      Hi Michael,
      I am so sorry to hear about your struggles and am so glad to hear that you’re ready to start dealing with your anxiety. I hope that Superhero Therapy will be helpful to you, in fact, one of the main characters in it also has agoraphobia and most have some kind of anxiety. It might be most helpful to also see a therapist who specializes in anxiety disorders and does cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), ideally with out of office “in vivo” exposures, which would mean that this therapist would come with you to help you face your fears. This last option is not always available. You can check out PsychologyToday.com website (if you live in the US) and maybe see if you can find a therapist to meet your needs, ideally one who specializes in anxiety. Feel free to use the book or maybe see if your therapist can help you incorporate the book into therapy. Either way, I am very proud of you for facing it. I know it’s scary but you are more courageous than you know.
      I hope this helps.
      Don’t forget your cape.

      Warmly,
      Janina Scarlet

      Reply
  19. Phil Broyles on

    Dear Janina,
    Do you have any examples of superheros struggling with and overcoming addictions?
    We work with alcohol and drug addiction and I am always looking for creative ideas for presenting our information to clients.
    Thank you

    Reply
  20. Raina on

    Hi there!

    I was wondering if you had a resource list for therapists who maintain this sort of practice with their patients? I’ve had issues with depression and would love to work through some of the things that have been coming up for me lately with some sort of geek type therapy.

    Thank you in advance.

    Reply
  21. Adam J Schaefer on

    Hello, I suffer from schizoaffective disorder, manic-depression, OCD, and anxiety. I’m out of state but I was wondering if you could be my therapist over the phone? Or someone like yourself.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *